Monday, February 29, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #8



This meme is held over on Book Date's blog and here we talk about what we are Currently Reading, What we read/posted the last week and what we plan on reading next week. I won't be posting what's coming up; you can get an idea by looking in my sidebars.

What I am Currently Reading:

Fiction:
I'm only three chapters into this but can tell I like the writing already. A mother/daughter mystery that goes back to post WWII communist Hungary to find the secrets of the past.





















Non-fiction
I Like this author! Big book may take some weeks to read!





















Graphic Novel/Manga





















I always have a short story collection going as I read one short story every morning with my cup of coffee. I have put that aside for Lent though and will be reading one chapter from The Holy Bible for the remainder of these 40 days.

What I Finished Reading and/or Posted This Week



Manga/Graphic Novels

Sunday, February 28, 2016

Angels and Saints: A Biblical Guide to Friendship with God's Holy Ones by Scott Hahn

Angels and Saints: A Biblical Guide to Friendship with God's Holy Ones by Scott Hahn
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Published May 27th 2014 by Image
Hardcover, 208 pages
Source: amazon.ca


I love Scott Hahn's books. I always buy them because I read them with a pen/pencil in hand and write in them, underline, draw arrows, exclamation marks, etc. He never fails to blow my mind, as a Catholic convert myself, I love the way he speaks and always tells me something new. I am a bit underwhelmed with this book, though. The first time I won't be giving Hahn a five star rating. I think the main downfall is the book's topic is just too broad compared to his other's that I've read. The first half was the most interesting and where I found the most 'aha!' moments I come to expect from the author. Mostly I learnt to appreciate the understanding of 'saint' with a small 's' in scripture and the "Saints" with a capital "S". There wasn't a lot of new information here for me, but it presented an informative and entertaining discourse on how saints become Saints and just who and what angels are. The second half focused on 12 canonized saints which Hahn picked for, he admits personal reasons. The biggies are here, of course, St Michael, St Paul, Augustine, Aquinas, The Little Flower and ends with The Blessed Virgin. Hahn tells their stories focusing on their humanity and how they lived forever pressing onward toward the saintly. Only saints live in heaven and these examples show how we can all start living a more saintly life today by following these people's examples. Nothing of the information here was entirely new to me, as I say it was a broad look at the topic, but I still found some gems of instruction, ideas, history and quotes to underline and fill the margins with my pen!



Friday, February 26, 2016

Blood on Snow & Midnight Sun by Jo Nesbo

Blood on Snow by Jo Nesbo
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Hardcover, 224 pages
Published April 7th 2015 by Random House Canada
Source: Review copy from Penguin Random House Canada

Blood on Snow (#1)

Something a little different from Jo Nesbo. I'm tempted to call this a novella since it's so much slimmer in length than Nesbo's other works but there are legitimate novels of 200 pages without needing to throw the term novella at them. This is pure crime noir. Set in the Norwegian underworld of drugs and prostitution. That's the background for our protagonist, a genuine anti-hero, who is a Fixer (a hitman) for one of the two heroin "bosses" who'd like complete control of this area. We meet Olav on the job. He's been hired to take out his boss's wife as she has been cheating on him. Obviously, things don't go smoothly on this hit, so there's your plot. But mostly this is a study of Olav. We learn about him. He's not a nice guy, he's done a lot of bad things and would continue to do so. We see he has a conscience about a few things, so he has some humanity. But why these things? They end up getting him in trouble. He's not a likeable character though the author is trying to make us feel that he's not all bad so perhaps we may like him? I can't fall for it, though. Nobody is *all* bad, I suppose Ted Bundy and Adolf Hitler weren't *all* bad but that doesn't mean I'm going to like them because they had remorse once. The book has two endings giving us two different outcomes; obviously, only one is real and the other is a character's imagination. I was a bit confused by this at first but after a good think, I understood what happened. Certainly readable, and I can see this making a good movie, but very different from Nesbo's other work. Don't read this first and judge him by it!





Midnight Sun by Jo Nesbø
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Hardcover, 288 pages
Published February 16th 2016 by Knopf Canada
Source: egalley via edelweiss

Blood on Snow (#2)


I liked this one much better than "Blood on Snow". It stars a minor character from the first book and is a sequel in that it takes place right after the events of the previous book, but parts of it take place concurrently with "Blood" during flashbacks of his life. Ulf is on the run from the Fisherman; he leaves the scene from which the last book ends, and he decides to travel as far north as he can ending up in the North Pole in a tiny village in an area of Lapland with the Samis and a very strict sect of Lutherans. The book is firstly a character study of Ulf, who accidentally got caught up with crime in Norway under false pretentions and hasn't done anything illegal except sell hash and steal money from the Fisherman because he was desperate for personal reasons. He is basically not a bad guy and found relief in this harsh land. He meets all sorts of characters here, including a very religious woman; the crime family tracks him down and things get pretty intense and dark. I didn't like any of the religious themes, and there was a lot. The Christians were so full of Old Testament brimstone they couldn't see any light and the atheist had so many misconceptions and believed downright untruths he didn't know what he was talking about so I ended up rolling my eyes a lot at both character's viewpoints. I also thought the ending was a bit too quick to wrap things up nicely. However, I still liked it pretty well, for a dark thriller of a hunted man.


Monday, February 22, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #7




This meme is held over on Book Date's blog and here we talk about what we are Currently Reading, What we read/posted the last week and what we plan on reading next week. I won't be posting what's coming up; you can get an idea by looking in my sidebars.

What I am Currently Reading

Fiction:

I've read *all* Jo Nesbo's books! I love him. This one is different though (according to all the reviews and the slim size) so I've been putting it off but the sequel to it was just published last month so I better get them read!




















Non-Fiction

Continuing to read this from last week. It's a short book but I'm purposely reading it slowly for Lent. Should finish it this week, though.




















Graphic Novel/Manga



















I always have a short story collection going as I read one short story every morning with my cup of coffee. I have put that aside for Lent though and will be reading one chapter from The Holy Bible for the remainder of these 40 days.  In case you are interested, I am reading "Job".

What I Finished Reading and/or Posted This Week



Graphic Novels/Manga

Sunday, February 21, 2016

Bound by Antonya Nelson

Bound by Antonya Nelson
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Paperback, 240 pages
Published October 11th 2011 by Bloomsbury
first published August 24th 2010
Source: LibraryThing Review Program


This was just ok for me. It sounded more interesting than it really was, having the BTK Killer always lurking in the background. The writing was good; it kept me reading, expectant. However, I found that nothing really happened in the end, no big climax. People had problems, stuff happened and it all worked out ok in the end. I like my fiction to have a plot; I kept expecting something to happen. All of the characters had secrets the reader was aware of but they never became a part of the plot, making me wonder what the point was. I didn't connect with any of the characters and I do not like this type of pointless, almost forced, happy ending.



Thursday, February 18, 2016

Unconquered: The Saga of Cousins Jerry Lee Lewis, Jimmy Swaggart, and Mickey Gilley by J.D. Davis

Unconquered: The Saga of Cousins Jerry Lee Lewis, Jimmy Swaggart, and Mickey Gilley by J.D. Davis
My rating: 4/5

Hardcover, 488 pages
Published May 1st 2012 by Brown Books Publishing Group
Source: Review copy from the publisher


A totally engaging read about three famous cousins who shared an era. The book is about each of them separately but always goes back to how they emerged from their beginnings, all three playing together as boys. They were born during the Great Depression, in the American south, Louisiana to be precise, risen on a Pentecostal faith that set them apart even where they belonged, attending tent revivals full of music, preaching and speaking in tongues. I was drawn to the book because of this setting and the era; most of the drama happens from the 30s to the 80s. Otherwise, I wasn't particularly fans of the individuals to start with. I knew of Jerry Lee's controversial life but don't really like his music, I knew Mickey from his 80s hits and had no idea much about Swaggart at all really, I wasn't even sure if he was one of the tv evangelists who got in trouble or not. But I went into it with an eagerness for a story of the South and rock 'n roll and was not disappointed. The book is highly researched with information coming from a variety of sources including family members. I grew interested in all three men and ended up respecting Mickey the most, but all three of them are definitely music legends. The book kept me entertained throughout no matter which person was being discussed and the author manages to tell both the good and bad evenhandedly. It's obvious the author is a fan of these men so there is no trash-talking at all but he does present the controversies, the wrong-doings, the warts, and all with honest and plain speaking. I'm really glad to have read this; it covered a broad era of music history and was both entertaining and enlightening for me. Good read!



Tuesday, February 16, 2016

The Widow by Fiona Barton

The Widow by Fiona Barton
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Paperback, 336 pages
Published February 16th 2016 by Penguin Canada
Source: Received a review copy from Random Penguin House Canada


This was a quick read for me; very engaging and a unique psychological thriller. Not exactly a mystery as we're privy to who the killer is from the beginning just not the details or hows. The story much more concerns the perpetrator's wife and unravels her (and our) slow reveals of the whole sordid, ugly truth. This is written from different points of view, a device I particularly like and Barton has done it splendidly. She also goes back and forth in time from a unique angle, only covering a period of four years. Admittedly this keeps the reader on their toes and I had to keep looking at the dates to see what perspective we were taking the case from each time. The story starts off in the present 2010 with the widow, next it goes back to 2006 when the crime first happens, then alternates between various years and points of view. I find this kind of storytelling very quick to read when done well and Barton had me transfixed. While there are no graphic scenes the subject matter of child pornography is hard to take at times but Barton takes an interesting perspective by looking at the case from a wife's point of view. What if she is completely unaware? Should she believe her husband? Can and should she support her husband? Can she ever really be totally unaware? Must she know at some point? Does she become complicit? Perhaps she is even a part of it? Even responsible for it? Many questions and more to ponder throughout which lead to a perfect ending.



Monday, February 15, 2016

Tales of Court and Castle by Joan Bodger

Tales of Court and Castle by Joan Bodger; illus Mark Lang
My rating: 3.5/5

Paperback, 96 pages
Published November 11th 2003 by Tundra Books
Source: used book sale


A collection of medieval tales of knights, kings and princess, mostly Welsh, from renowned late Canadian storyteller Joan Bodger. These are short tales and are meant for children, they have been captured here in print but are meant for reading aloud. The stories are vivid and full of wonder and do beg to be spoken aloud. I'd never heard of Bodger before and this is just a short sampling of her work to whet the appetite of what she must have been like to hear live. The illustrations that accompany the text are gorgeously detailed line drawings.

1) Young Tristan - Tristan's story of how he won back his land as King but gave it up to serve King Mark as a knight. A Welsh tale.

2) To the Dark Tower - a grand retelling of the Childe Roland poem, with some verses kept between the narrative. Also has Merlin in it.

3) Iron John - This tale is new to me! A cursed forest and a naughty prince whose curiosity begets him the favour of the man-creature living in the forest. This has it all: curses, enchantments, and princesses to be won.

4) Burd Janet - Burd Janet rescues Tamlane [sic] from the servitude of the Elf Queen.

5) The Warrior Queen - An Irish King and Queen are talking in bed and arguing over who is better, richer, has more, etc, and inevitably this "pillow talk" leads to all the troubles in Ireland. This one is pretty wordy and I'd see it going over better orally than being read silently.

6) The Roman Emperor and the Welsh Princess - I can't place this to any true story or tale I've heard before but, a Roman emperor dreams of the most beautiful woman in the world. She is finally tracked down and found to be a Welsh Princess. After much battle, winning the British Isles, and taking back Rome from a usurper they rule the Roman Empire for many years.

7) Tristan Hero - And the book comes full circle with the heroic tale of Tristan's death.



It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #6


This meme is held over on Book Date's blog and here we talk about what we are Currently Reading, What we read/posted the last week and what we plan on reading next week. I won't be posting what's coming up; you can get an idea by looking in my sidebars.


What I am Currently Reading

Fiction:

This is the 2nd book in his new series and I am anxious to get cracking on this today.
 Far From True by Linwood Barclay


















Non-Fiction

Now that Lent is upon us I thought I'd turn to my favourite Catholic writer, Scott Hahn, for some theology.


















Manga/Graphic Novel

Classic sci-fi retold in graphic format.


















I always have a short story collection going as I read one short story every morning with my cup of coffee. I am putting that aside for Lent and will be reading one chapter from The Holy Bible for these 40 days.

Not a lot of posting done this week as a dear friend of ours passed away. It was a sad and busy week ending with a wonderful but emotionally exhausting funeral mass. He was the Deacon of our church so we had the Bishop presiding and I was humbled to be part of the CWL honour guard. A kind, jolly, teddy bear of a man who suffered excruciatingly, but a relatively short time with a horrible form of cancer.  Rest in Peace, Deacon Pat.

What I Finished Reading and/or Posted This Week



Graphic Novels/Manga

Saturday, February 13, 2016

A Place in Time by C.A. Hocking

A Place in Time by C.A. Hocking
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Kindle Edition, lulu.com, 150 pages
Published 2011
first published June 28th 2006
Source: Kindle Freebie


Written by an Australian writer, this little crime novel surprised me to be much more than I had expected. A 40-year-old man suffers depression every year on his birthday since he witnessed his father's murder by a stranger when he was 11 years old. Now living in England, after much therapy and having the financial means he and his mum go back to Australia, to the scene to either jog his memory or at least put the past to rest. A well-written and engrossing read. Not what I had expected as it ventures off into a realm of magical realism which must be worked out as the story progresses. If you like your crimes to take place fully in the real world, this won't be for you. Otherwise, it is an intriguing look at when powerful emotions collide in space and time. Whether the story involves time travel or something more mystical it is a lovely story of a family, mother and son, rescued from a life of abuse. Lovely writing. I'd certainly try the author again.



Tuesday, February 9, 2016

All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews

All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Paperback, 336 pages
Published February 24th 2015 by Vintage Canada
first published April 15th 2014
Source: review copy from Random Penguin House Canada


I'm purposely being vague however, this review may contain what some would consider SPOILERS. There are a lot of reviews of this book so I won't say too much and just narrow in on my main points. I enjoyed the read, Toews is an excellent writer and her characters are always wonderful. I think I'll always enjoy any book she writes. This family, with all its extended aunts and cousins, etc, is so strong when it comes together to be a family to endure the sorrows together and I loved them as an example of family. What the (western) world has so much grown away from and lost. I loved Lottie and Yoli, such women full of fortitude, even though Yoli would have us believe she was full of weakness. Elf, the sister described as not wanting to live, I didn't like. We never got inside her head and I understand the point of that. But we were also not told what her problem was, psychiatrically, what was her diagnosis. She refused meds and I became frustrated with the author for not, at least, giving us the information the family would have. Thus, the reader guesses what is wrong with her and I really did not like her at all when she forces her sister, who is against it, to realistically investigate euthanasia on her behalf. The first death was a beautiful one and showed how a well-lived life can end and how those left behind gather strength from it. In the end, I didn't find the book sad at all. I'm glad the book ended the way it did.

Monday, February 8, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #5


This meme is held over on Book Date's blog and here we talk about what we are Currently Reading, What we read/posted the last week and what we plan on reading next week. I won't be posting what's coming up; you can get an idea by looking in my sidebars. 

What I am Currently Reading


Fiction:

I'll be finished this shocking little crime drama before this blog even posts today but I want to write this before finishing the final chapters.  I have no idea what I'm going to read next. It will be a print book so I'll grab my pile and spend a while choosing.


Non-Fiction
I'm coming into the home stretch with this one. I've hit the 80s where Jimmy Lee's hard-living ways have ended his career and nearly his life, Jimmy Swaggart's career is about to hit the fan, and finally, Mickey will reach superstardom.




















Manga/Graphic Novel






I always have a short story collection going as I read one short story every morning with my cup of coffee. My current collection is:

Tales of Court and Castle by Joan Bodger



What I Finished Reading and/or Posted This Week



Manga/Graphic Novels



Sunday, February 7, 2016

The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories by Ambrose Bierce

The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories by Ambrose Bierce
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Kindle Edition, 100 pages
Published November 17th 2015 by Dover Publications
first published April 1998
Source: egalley via netgalley


Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) was a Victorian author of the weird and macabre specialing in ghost stories. Though during his life he was more renowned as a satirist, journalist, and editorialist. Thankfully, we've remembered him for his eerie tales. I've come across his stories in anthologies several times but this is the first author specific collection I've read. I had come across three of these stories before, but they make good re-reading. Bierce is comparable to Poe but easier to read. The stories in this collection have been selected from the 1909-1912 editions of "The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce" and show a mix of his ghost and, as the title calls them, "horror" stories (but I wouldn't necessarily give them that classification, but more general simply "weird tales"). I liked the weird, macabre tales the best and I'd recommend him to your reading list for those interested in Victorian ghost stories or tales of the weird.

1) The Eyes of the Panther - A young woman refuses to marry a man repeatedly and he demands to know why so she tells him she is insane and proceeds to tell him a story. It's a good story but it made me think too much of the original movie "Cat People", perhaps they got the idea from this story. (3/5)

2) The Moonlit Road - I hadn't recognized just by the title but it came to me quickly that I've read this one before. A son is called home from college urgently to discover his mother has been brutally murdered. Shortly afterward his father, while out on a walk with him, takes off and disappears forever. Told in three points of view first from the son, then the father and finally the mother, through the aid of a medium. None of them knows the whole truth, only the reader is able put most of it together, but afterthought still leaves a few questions. A creepy story. (4/5)

3) The Boarded Window - This is a creepy shocker that you have no idea where it is going. It starts off easy going enough and you wonder where it is going by the halfway point; it is quite short. Then it starts getting interesting with the tension mounting and pow! it gets you with the ending. (5/5)

4) The Man and the Snake - Another creepy little story with the shocker ending. This time, it leaves you puzzled wondering if what occurred was real or all in the mind. (5/5)

5) The Secret of Macarger's Gulch - A well-told ghost story! A man stops at an abandoned house in the middle of nowhere. He can't get to sleep because of a feeling of danger, perhaps a bear or a ghost? He does fall asleep, dreams, then wakes up and that is when the adventure begins. Leaves an uneasy feeling. (5/5)

6) The Middle Toe of the Right Foot - Oh I liked this, not very frightening but a bit grizzly to start. A house remains abandoned because of its claim to be haunted but not least likely because the former owner one night slashed the throats of his wife and two children and then absconded into the night. Some time later the house becomes the designated sight of two gentlemen who have called each other out to a duel: a knife fight in a darkened room. (4/5)

7) A Psychological Shipwreck - A man has a vision of an encounter with a young woman on a sinking ship, then rouses to find that he himself has been fine and dandy on another ship all this time. Then ensues an interesting story. A bit "whoo-whoo" for the times but didn't do much for me. (3/5)

8) A Holy Terror - This is just plain creepy. I'm not sure if it is a ghost story or not but a man does meet up with a skeleton and his death while grave digging and that is only a part of the story! A man goes to a ghost town that was once a thriving California Gold Rush town. Now deserted he plots off a stake and decidedly sets out looking for something specific and then we are told his curious history and what follows. This is the longest story in the collection so far. (4/5)

9) John Bartine's Watch: A Story by a Physician - A fairly short story of a man who is troubled by the watch of an ancestor who was taken away as a traitor to the rebel George Washington and never heard from again. Atmospheric, but predictable ending. (3/5)

10) Beyond the Wall - A man visits an old friend he hasn't seen in some time to find him in a dejected state, upon hearing a tapping on his tower wall the friend relates a tale of unremitted love, sorrow, death and ghosts. Again very atmospheric. (4/5)

11) A Watcher by the Dead - Three doctors play a game by betting that a man cannot spend the night in an abandoned house with a corpse in the dark due to some theory they have. Things turn out as we suspect but there is a surprising twist ending and then the author turns to humour to finish off the tale. I didn't like the funny part but the rest was good. (4/5)

12) Moxon's Master - This would have been a chilling tale at its own time. One that deals with whether machine's have intelligence. The first half was a bit boring for me as the philosophy and science is outdated by modern standards but I can imagine the thought it provoked at the time. Then it gets into the story of whether one man, a machinist, has created a thinking machine. It has a creepy ending. I really enjoyed this, though, because it explored an automaton chess player and a few years ago I read a graphic novel on *the* famous Victorian automaton chess player which was very good. (4/5)



Thursday, February 4, 2016

Bonita Faye by Margaret Moseley

Bonita Faye by Margaret Moseley
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Kindle Edition, 240 pages
Expected publication: February 23rd 2016 by Brash Books
first published May 1996
Source: egalley from Brash Books


A fantastic surprise! I would say I was hooked by the first chapter but truth be told I was hooked by the first paragraph! Bonita Faye is quite the character and if you are used to reading southern fiction Bonita is up there with the best. This is not a spoiler because I'm going to talk about the very first sentence in the book. Bonita Faye starts her story off by telling us her secret, that she killed her no-good husband Billy Roy and does in such a charming manner I was soon gasping with laughter. Bonita is writing from her golden years and goes back and forth into the past to tell us her story which centres around that defining moment that changed her life when that abusive overbearing man left her life. It's hard to describe the genre here, I wouldn't call it mystery but there are more than the one murder so I'm apt to call it Southern Noir with high doses of humour. Sincerely, the book is more about a young Okie (part Arkie) woman raped by her step-father at 14, married to black-eyed Billy Roy at 17, uneducated who takes her life (and another's) into her own hands one day and sets forth to learn to accept her soul, love herself, and find the true-love of her life, but she finds two. Half the book takes place in Paris, France in the days after the liberation and end of WWII. This is where she has her awakening and education but darkness is here too. It's a gritty story, with the poverty and abuse of Bonita's early life, the Resistance and Nazi-occupied France repercussions still alive in the new French society, her last husband fights in the Korean war and Bonita has lived a hardscrabble life to get where she gets. However, throughout this book, it is first and foremost a Southern Fiction tale of charm and comedy. Humour is the order of the day and I've literally not enjoyed a book simply so much because it made me smile for some time. Bonita is the type of woman you want to have for a friend, a true southern woman, perhaps from the wrong side of the tracks, but she raised herself up and kept the best of both worlds chucking what she had no use for from each. Laugh out loud funny with its hijinx and charm.



Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Cobweb Walking by Sara Banerji

Cobweb Walking by Sara Banerji
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Paperback, 160 pages
Published September 1st 2012 by Bloomsbury
First published 1986
Source: egalley via netgalley


I've read one other book by this author and I feel like I've stumbled upon a hidden gem. There are currently no reviews for this book on either Librarything or Goodreads and only one on Amazon but I haven't read it. I feel intimidated to be putting my paltry so-called review out there alone. This book defies genre but is imbued with magical realism throughout. One cannot offer up a summary as this is a short book, an odd tale that defies summing up without giving away the secrets. While the story is entirely realistic, it is told by a seventeen-year-old female dwarf who lives in a fairy tale world which as just been shattered by a bomb. Her real name is Morgan but her Daddy calls her Fairy. She can walk on cobwebs and leaves no footprints in the snow yet now for the first time ever she is by herself lost in the "city" and people are staring at her, children point and one even asked its mother if she were real. Something terrible has happened, more terrible than the bomb; we need to find out what Morgan's secret is. This is beautifully written and mesmerizing. Such an odd story, yet compelling. I can't say anything else without giving the story away, but, in the end, I was of two minds. One half of me felt sorry for Morgan; that she had been raised too over-protected while the other half was jealous that she was allowed to live in such a special fairytale world before she had to come of age, as we all must eventually.



Monday, February 1, 2016

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? #4


This meme is held over on Book Date's blog and here we talk about what we are Currently Reading, What we read/posted the last week and what we plan on reading next week. I won't be posting what's coming up; you can get an idea by looking in my sidebars. 

What I am Currently Reading

Fiction:

I'm just starting this but it will be my third by the author.
 All My Puny Sorrows by Miriam Toews

Non-Fiction:

This is going to take me a while to read but I'm really enjoying it. I've gone from the early thirties to early 50's. Rock n roll is about to hit the scene in the next chapter! Elvis is going to hit the airwaves and Jerry Lee is finally going to get noticed.

Manga/Graphic Novel:






















I always have a short story collection going as I read one short story every morning with my cup of coffee. My current collection continues to be:

The Moonlit Road and Other Ghost and Horror Stories by Ambrose Bierce


What I Finished Reading and/or Posted This Week
Stopping for a Spell: Three Magical Fantasies by Diana Wynne Jones
Harry Lane is Innocent by J. Scaddon
The Skeleton Tree by Iain Lawrence

Manga/Graphic Novels
The Seven Deadly Sins 12 by Nakaba Suzuki
Noragami: Stray God 10 by Adachitoka
Cool Japan Guide: Fun in the Land of Manga, Lucky Cats and Ramen by Abby Denson
Sons of the Devil, Volume 1 by Brian Buccellato
Apollo: The Brilliant One by George O'Connor